What IS the Lower Connecticut River
and Coastal Region Land Trust Exchange?

Lower CT River Valley Land Trust Bylaws

Lower Connecticut River and Coastal Region Land Trust Exchange (LTE)
Individual Land Trust Member Survey Form

Lower Connecticut River and Coastal Region
Land Trust Exchange Funding Guide/Matrix

Bylaw Form

The Lower Connecticut River Valley Council of Governments has received the Lower Connecticut River Land Trust (LCRLT) from the Connecticut River Gateway Commission, effective January 1, 2018. The Gateway Commission intention was for RiverCOG to use the LCRLT for the furtherance of the LTE and future land conservation projects. The plan at this point is for the LTE to become a formal committee of the LCRLT and to amend the bylaws to create this committee, establish its structure and responsibilities, and safeguard funds raised. The bylaws inherited with the LCRLT will be amended to enable the LCRLT to function as a host of the LTE. Please discuss with your boards and consider the following questions. The next RiverCOG council meeting will be held February 28, 2018. The returned comments will be summarized for the CEO’s for that meeting. Thank you all for your time and attention to this questionnaire and for working to ensure the conservation and protection of the lower Connecticut River region! The Individual Land Trust Member Review and Comment of Lower Connecticut River Land Trust Form can be downloaded and printed by clicking on the image above.





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CLCC

The Land Trust Exchange Mission

September 21, 2009

Lower CT River Valley Council of Government's (RiverCOG) mission as it concerns the Land Trust Collaboration Initiative is to:

Attorney Fritz Gahagen
Attorney Fritz Gahagan Speaks to LTE Members
  • Create a stronger connection between the local, regional conservation community, and the Regional, State, and Federal land use planning process;

  • Further our ability to provide an educational and planning opportunity for environmental and landscape protection for members of our region’s land trusts and conservation commissions to promote landscape linkages, tool creation, data acquisition, and sharing to enable effective collaboration and cooperation, in a regional manner, towards the creation of trails and greenways, and protection of existing habitat, water quality, and scenic and cultural landscape corridors;  and

  • Identify possible collaboration mechanisms and business structures that will not take away from an individual land trust’s unique and important relationship and place in its own community, but enable them to practice best management and business principles.  This could allow each to operate to its greatest potential concerning long term planning goals, future land acquisition, and the sustainable stewardship of their already existing protected open space. Business structures and collaboration mechanisms could include shared staff to help with record keeping, membership mailings, newsletter production, record keeping, fund raising, and grant writing as well as office space to provide a place for meetings, and where members could share computer hardware and software. 











































































































Bionator Neubiberg
Bionator Neubiberg